Tag Archives: Diabetes Type

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

The goal of treatment at first is to lower your high blood glucose levels. Long-term goals are to prevent problems from diabetes.

The most important way to treat and manage type 2 diabetes is activity and nutrition.

LEARN THESE SKILLS

Learning diabetes management skills will help you live well with diabetes. These skills help prevent health problems and the need for medical care. Skills include:

How to test and record your blood glucose
What to eat and when
How to take medications, if needed
How to recognize and treat low and high blood sugar
How to handle sick days
Where to buy diabetes supplies and how to store them
It may take several months to learn these skills. Keep learning about diabetes, its complications, and how to control and live with the disease. Stay up-to-date on new research and treatments.

MANAGING YOUR BLOOD SUGAR

Checking your blood sugar levels yourself and writing down the results tells you how well you are managing your diabetes. Talk to your doctor and diabetes educator about how often to check.

To check your blood sugar level, you use a device called a glucose meter. Usually, you prick your finger with a small needle called a lancet. This gives you a tiny drop of blood. You place the blood on a test strip and put the strip into the meter. The meter gives you a reading that tells you the level of your blood sugar.

Your health care provider or diabetes educator will help set up a testing schedule for you. Your doctor will help you set a target range for your blood sugar numbers. Keep these factors in mind:

Most people with type 2 diabetes only need to check their blood sugar once or twice a day.
If your blood sugar level is under control, you may only need to check it a few times a week.
You may test yourself when you wake up, before meals, and at bedtime.
You may need to test more often when you are sick or under stress.
Keep a record of your blood sugar for yourself and your health care provider. Based on your numbers, changes may need to be made to your meals, activity or medicines to keep your blood sugar level in the right range.

DIET AND WEIGHT CONTROL

Work closely with your doctor, nurse, and dietitian to learn how much fat, protein, and carbohydrates you need in your diet. Your meal plans should fit your lifestyle and habits and should include foods that you like.

Managing your weight and having a well-balanced diet are important. Some people with type 2 diabetes can stop taking medicines after losing weight. This does not mean that their diabetes is cured. They still have diabetes.

Very obese patients whose diabetes is not well managed with diet and medicine may consider weight loss (bariatric) surgery.

REGULAR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Regular activity is important for everyone. It is even more important when you have diabetes. Reasons why exercise is good for your health:

Lowers your blood sugar level without medicine
Burns extra calories and fat to help manage your weight
Improves blood flow and blood pressure
Increases your energy level
Improves your ability to handle stress
Talk to your health care provider before starting any exercise program. People with type 2 diabetes may need to take special steps before, during, and after physical activity or exercise.

Diabetes and exercise
MEDICATIONS TO TREAT DIABETES

If diet and exercise do not help keep your blood sugar at normal or near-normal levels, your doctor may prescribe medication. Since these drugs help lower your blood sugar levels in different ways, your doctor may have you take more than one drug.

Some of the most common types of medication are listed below. They are taken by mouth or injection.

Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors
Biguanides
DPP IV inhibitors
Injectable medicines
Meglitinides
Sulfonylureas
Thiazolidinediones
You may need to take insulin if your blood sugar cannot be controlled with any of the above medicines. Insulin must be injected under the skin using a syringe, insulin pen, or pump. It cannot be taken by mouth because the acid in the stomach destroys insulin.

PREVENTING COMPLICATIONS

Your doctor may prescribe medicines or other treatments to reduce your chance of developing eye disease, kidney disease, and other conditions that are common in people with diabetes. These conditions are called complications of diabetes.

FOOT CARE

People with diabetes are more likely than those without diabetes to have foot problems. Diabetes damages the nerves. This can make you less able to feel pressure on the foot. You many not notice a foot injury until you get a severe infection.

Diabetes can also damage blood vessels. Small sores or breaks in the skin may become deeper skin sores (ulcers). The affected limb may need to be amputated if these skin ulcers do not heal or become larger, deeper or infected.

To prevent problems with your feet:

Stop smoking if you smoke.
Improve control of your blood sugar.
Get a foot exam by your health care provider at least twice a year and learn if you have nerve damage.
Check and care for your feet every day. This is very important when you already have nerve or blood vessel damage or foot problems.
Make sure you wear the right kind of shoes. Ask your health care provider what is right for you.
Support Groups

There are many diabetes resources that can help you understand more about type 2 diabetes. You can also learn ways to manage your condition so you can live well with diabetes.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Diabetes is a lifelong disease and there is no cure.

Some people with type 2 diabetes no longer need medicine if they lose weight and become more active. When they reach their ideal weight, their body’s own insulin and a healthy diet can control their blood sugar level.

Possible Complications

After many years, diabetes can lead to serious problems:

You could have eye problems, including trouble seeing (especially at night), and light sensitivity. You could become blind.
Your feet and skin can develop sores and infections. After a long time, your foot or leg may need to be amputated. Infection can also cause pain and itching in other parts of the body.
Diabetes may make it harder to control your blood pressure and cholesterol. This can lead to a heart attack, stroke, and other problems. It can become harder for blood to flow to your legs and feet.
Nerves in your body can get damaged, causing pain, tingling, and numbness.
Because of nerve damage, you could have problems digesting the food you eat. You could feel weakness or have trouble going to the bathroom. Nerve damage can make it harder for men to have an erection.
High blood sugar and other problems can lead to kidney damage. Your kidneys may not work as well as they used to. They may even stop working so that you need dialysis or a kidney transplant.
When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call 911 right away if you have:

Chest pain or pressure
Fainting or unconsciousness
Seizure
Shortness of breath
These symptoms can quickly get worse and become emergency conditions (such as convulsions or hypoglycemic coma).

Also call your doctor if you have:

Numbness, tingling, or pain in your feet or legs
Problems with your eyesight
Sores or infections on your feet
Symptoms of high blood sugar (being very thirsty, having blurry vision, having dry skin, feeling weak or tired, needing to urinate a lot)
Symptoms of low blood sugar (feeling weak or tired, trembling, sweating, feeling irritable, having trouble thinking clearly, fast heartbeat, double or blurry vision, feeling uneasy)

 

Retrieved from:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001356/

Type 2 Diabetes Exams and Tests

Exams and Tests

Your doctor may suspect that you have type 2 diabetes if your blood sugar level is greater than 200 mg/dL. To confirm the proper diagnosis, one or more of the following tests may be taken.

Diabetic blood tests:

Fasting blood glucose level — diabetes is diagnosed if it is greater than 126 mg/dL multiple times
Hemoglobin A1C test — Diabetes: 6.5% or more
Oral glucose tolerance test — diabetes is confirmed if glucose level is more than 200 mg/dL 2 hours after ingesting a special high sugar drink

Diabetes testing is suggested for:

Overweight kids who have other risk chances for diabetes, beginning at age ten and repeated every two years
Over-weight adults (if Body Mass Index is greater than 25) that have other risk chances
Adults over age forty-five every three years
If you have been shown to have type 2 diabetes, you will need to work very closely with your primary care physician. Most likely you will need to visit your primary care physician every three months. At the visits, you can expect your primary care physician to perform the following:

Check your blood pressure
Check the bones and skin on your legs and feet
Check if your feet are feeling numb
Check your eye’s health
The following tests will help you and your doctor monitor your diabetes and prevent problems:

Testyour blood pressure checked at least every year (blood pressure goals should be 140/80 mm/Hg or lower).
Test your A1C (hemoglobin A1C) everysix months if your diabetes is well controlled; if it is not then every three months.
Have your cholesterol and triglyceride levels checked yearly (aim for LDL levels below 70-100 mg/dL).
Get yearly tests to make sure your kidneys are working well (microalbuminuria and serum creatinine).
Visit your eye doctor at least once a year, or more often if you have signs of diabetic eye disease.
See the dentist every six months for a thorough dental cleaning and exam. Make sure your dentist and hygienist know that you have diabetes.